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Hello, I'm Noah Sussman

Jul
29th
Tue
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Generative drawings done in the FlowPaper iOS app.

Jul
26th
Sat
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Video feedback drawing, created with iPhone, Apple TV and airplay.

Video feedback drawing, created with iPhone, Apple TV and airplay.

Jul
25th
Fri
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Generative drawings created in FlowPaper on iOS.

Chaos is awesome ;-)

Jul
18th
Fri
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Please stop trying to sell me on management positions while offering a “QA Engineer” title and salary

Recently I was sent a job posting that embodied what I will call the Pernicious Myth of the QA Automation Engineer. Here’s just one line:

Own automated testing capabilities across Web, mobile and production processes.

Um.

An engineer cannot by definition take responsibility (that’s what “ownership” means — right?) for features that cut across multiple groups. In all but the smallest companies, Web and mobile would be managed by different teams. With different MANAGERS.

Engineers don’t take responsibility for the behavior of MULTIPLE managers across different teams.

This is a Director’s job.

Managing software capabilities across multiple teams is the job of a mid-level Engineering manager such as a director or (in larger organizations) a VP.

Why not? Because decades of computer engineering experience show that it never works.

Management (with all its wondrous hierarchical levels) is responsible for behavior of people within and across teams. Engineers and designers are responsible for the behavior and organization of the product. Not the people. People are a management problem. Especially at scale. Organizations that forget this fail.

Takeaway: do not sign on for a director’s job at an engineer’s salary

I’m not saying no one should take responsibilty for the “tests and testability” of an application or service.

What I am saying is that someone should be explicity responsible for testing across the whole organizaiton and that person should be at the director or executive level. Never at the engineer or team lead level. Ever.

Jul
17th
Thu
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Who owns testing?

There is a widespread misconception that QA should own testing. This is false. Not only is it false but it doesn’t even make sense. You cannot have a discrete group that “owns” testing because testing is integral to the activities of both engineers and designers. Organizations often make a choice to ignore this, but the choice is based on cultural inertia rather than science.

Engineering and Product always owns testing because testing is a design process. If QA performs all testing and devises test plans, then that’s an explicit decision by Engineering and Product groups to try not to own testing.

As an engineer-or-designer, you can try not to own testing, but it doesn’t work. Because testing is part of the engineering and design process. Testing is not an activity in itself. Rather it is an aspect of the larger activity of designing and building software systems.

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There is a very deep disconnect in the software industry with regard to QA and Testing.

There is a very deep disconnect in the software industry with regard to QA and Testing.

Jun
1st
Sun
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The problem with asking where testing/qa “fit in” to devops

The problem with asking where testing/qa “fit in” to devops is that testing/qa is part of dev.

It’s a historical mistake that test/qa was marginalized to the point it’s now seen as a separate discipline.

May
30th
Fri
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If you want your functional test suite to run faster, work out how to write smaller tests that achieve the same effect.
— Simon Stewart
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All dependencies of a method should be obvious from looking at the method signature.
— Sebastian Bergmann
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Static analysis is a good replacement for 100% [test] coverage… not that you shouldn’t get to 100% coverage
— Rasmus Lerdorf